Posts in '2017'

Our response: Universal Credit helpline will be free by the end of the month

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This morning David Gauke, Secretary of State for the Department for Work & Pensions, announced the Universal Credit helpline will be free by the end of the month, and all DWP helplines will be free by end of the year.

Here’s our response:

“Since our Early Warnings report in April, The Trussell Trust has consistently highlighted the impact of the cost of the Universal Credit helpline – a foodbank in our network even reported they had installed new phones in their centre because people referred to them couldn’t afford to call the helpline from home.

“We therefore welcome David Gauke’s announcement today that there will be no charge for calling this helpline by the end of this month, and for all DWP helplines by the end of the year. This is a sensible first step in starting to address some of the issues with Universal Credit seen by Trussell Trust foodbanks, but their experience tells us that there are other significant barriers that still need to be addressed to prevent people affected by Universal Credit issues from needing a foodbank.”

Garry Lemon, Head of Media & External Affairs

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Observer Food Monthly Awards – Outstanding Achievement

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Photograph: Adrian Sherratt for the Observer

We are delighted to announce that our work to help people facing food poverty has been nationally recognised. On Thursday 12th October, we were honoured to receive the Observer Food Monthly Award for Outstanding Achievement. Observer columnist Jay Rayner and television personality and food writer Nigella Lawson co-hosted this year’s celebrations.

The awards, which are now in their 14th year, are voted for by both readers and a judging panel.  Speaking on receiving the award, Elizabeth Pollard, Chair of Trustees said: ‘We are so proud of how hard everyone works to stop people going hungry, and grateful to every donor and supporter who contributes to making that work possible. We also thank the Observer for recognising everyone’s contribution and highlighting the work that needs to be done.”

For the full story, as featured in The Guardian at the weekend, click here: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/oct/15/ofm-awards-2017-outstanding-achievement-trussell-trust-food-banks

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Volunteers across the UK giving ‘at least £30 million’ a year in unpaid work to support foodbanks

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  • First joint study of Trussell Trust and independent foodbanks finds volunteers contribute more than 4 million hours in support to UK foodbanks every year.
  • Ground-breaking research also reveals the monetary value of volunteering in foodbanks.
  • As Universal Credit rolls out, dramatically increasing the number of people needing emergency food aid, foodbank providers say that voluntary organisations cannot replace the welfare state – the government must step up and take responsibility.

The Trussell Trust, which operates the largest network of foodbanks in the UK, and the Independent Food Aid Network (IFAN), which advocates on behalf of independent foodbanks and emergency food aid projects, have today released a crucial evaluation of the vital work foodbank volunteers do in their communities. This follows work by IFAN to count the true number of foodbanks in the UK, which has now found that more than 700 independent foodbank centres, beyond The Trussell Trust’s 1235, are providing emergency food and support to people in crisis.

The research, the first of its kind, has found that volunteers do a staggering 2,909,196 hours of unpaid work each year distributing food. Calculating the value of such work using the National Living Wage, currently set at £7.50 an hour for the over 25s, this equates to £21,818,967 a year; or 55,945 hours, with a value of £419,587, each week.

The study also found volunteers are doing a further 1,208,602 hours of additional tasks per year, including stock-taking, fundraising, picking up and delivering food, inputting data, and other work, worth £9,064,516 alone.

Taken together, the 4,117,798 hours of volunteer work each year contributes at least £30,883,482 to the effort to tackle Britain’s hunger crisis.

Samantha Stapley, Head of Operations, for The Trussell Trust, said today:

It’s astonishing to see a value put to the amazing and tireless work done by foodbank volunteers up and down the UK. It’s a testament to the power and generosity of communities. Without them, foodbanks in The Trussell Trust network would not have been able to give nearly 1.2 million emergency food supplies to people in crisis last year. And without this vital community support hundreds of thousands of people would be hungry, and with nowhere to turn.

‘But it is equally important to remember that whilst foodbank volunteers do inspiring work, they cannot replace the welfare safety net. Issues with benefit payments remain the main reason why people need a foodbank parcel, and with issues caused by Universal Credit increasingly reported by foodbanks as a concern, we urge the Government to take steps to make sure people don’t face going hungry in the UK today.’

 

Professor Jon May, Chair of the Independent Food Aid Network’s Board of Trustees, said today:

IFAN supports the efforts of the thousands of foodbanks, and tens of thousands of volunteers, working so hard to help feed their communities. But we call on Government to stop relying on foodbanks, and to accept its responsibilities for Britain’s hunger crisis. As citizens we enter into a contract. In exchange for our financial contributions, Government is required to ensure sufficient support is available to all, so that no one needs to rely on charity to feed themselves or their families.

‘That contract has been broken. Even as Government plan £12billion in cuts to social security benefits by 2019/20[i], some of our largest companies continue to avoid paying their fair share in tax. We now know that, though we already pay £11 billion a year to subsidise a low-wage economy[ii]because employers are not paying people enough to live on, volunteers up and down the country are providing a further £30million a year in ’free’ labour to ensure that our fellow citizens in low paid work, on zero hour contracts, or relying on a broken benefits system have enough to eat. Whilst we must continue to support those in need, we must also – and urgently – advocate for fundamental change.

ENDS

 

For more information, please contact Abby Jitendra at The Trussell Trust, on  abby.jitendra@trusselltrust.org, 020 3745 5981, or Sabine Goodwin at IFAN, at sabinegoodwin@gmail.com.

 

Notes

The research was devised and carried out collaboratively between researchers at The Trussell Trust and IFAN, with counsel from academics at Queen Mary University of London. A randomised sample of 300 Trussell Trust and independent foodbank centres was created and weighted according to the total number of Trussell Trust and independent foodbank centres, to create a representative sample for survey. Sample centres were asked 3 short questions about: the average number of volunteers per session; their hours of distribution, including set-up and packing-away time; and any additional volunteer hours spent doing ‘behind the scenes’ work (liaising with donors, picking up and sorting food, delivering food parcels, fund raising, and paperwork). The monetary value of this volunteer work was calculated by multiplying the number of volunteer hours by the National Living Wage.

Independent Food Aid Network:

  • The Independent Food Aid Network (IFAN) is a network of independent, grassroots emergency food aid providers including foodbanks and a range other food aid projects; for example, community kitchens, drop-in meal programmes, pay as you feel cafes, social supermarkets, and holiday hunger programmes.
  • IFAN has identified more than 700 independent foodbanks operating across the UK.
  • Independent foodbanks operate in a range of ways, with some working with a referral and some with ‘open access’ systems; some offering pre-packaged food parcels, and others a choice of food. The number of times a person may use an independent foodbank also varies. Many independent foodbanks offer other services, and volunteers frequently ‘sign post’ clients to other organisations who can help. Some independent foodbanks also run food delivery schemes.
  • IFAN exists to provide a voice for independent food aid organisations. It has no faith based or political affiliations.
  • IFAN recognises that food poverty is the result of a complex set of structural issues that require Government action.
  • More information about IFAN can be found at foodaidnetwork.org.uk

The Trussell Trust:

  • The Trussell Trust is an anti-poverty charity that runs a network of 1235 foodbank centres across the UK.
  • Trussell Trust foodbanks provide three days’-worth of nutritionally balanced food and support to people in crisis in the UK, and many foodbanks offer free additional services, like money advice and budget cookery courses as part of the charity’s ‘More Than Food’ approach, to build resilience and help prevent people needing referral to a foodbank again. Foodbank volunteers are also trained to signpost people to other agencies and services able to help resolve the underlying cause of the crisis.
  • Everyone who comes to a Trussell Trust foodbank is referred by a professional such as a social worker, health visitor or schools liaison officer. Over 30,000 frontline professionals refer people to Trussell Trust foodbanks, and 50 percent are statutory agencies.
  • Over 90 percent of food given out by Trussell Trust foodbanks is donated by the public. In 2016-17, 11,175 tonnes of food were given to people in crisis.
  • For more on The Trussell Trust visit trusselltrust.org

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If Universal Credit rollout continues like this, foodbanks won’t be able to catch everyone who falls

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Last year The Trussell Trust provided 1.2 million emergency three day emergency food supplies. We recently released the biggest study into foodbank use in Britain to date. We found that the majority of people referred to our foodbanks were at the time supported by working age benefits. Yet the average income for households was just £319 in the month before they were referred to us.

It’s no surprise that trying to live off so little for an entire month can lead to destitution and hunger. Most households had been unable to afford heating, toiletries or suitable shoes or clothes for the weather. 78% had skipped meals and gone without eating – sometimes for days at a time, often multiple times a year. (more…)

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The Trussell Trust calls for a pause to the roll-out of Universal Credit

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Mark Ward, Interim CEO said:

“Universal Credit has the potential to be transformative: we welcome the intention to simplify a previously complicated system and make work pay. However, in its current form, we fear it is doing more harm than good for some of our country’s most vulnerable people.  

Foodbanks tell us that Universal Credit is inadvertently leaving people without any money for six or more weeks, leading to debt, rental arrears, and poor mental health. People in seasonal or insecure work are finding it difficult to budget as they don’t know how much they’ll get paid next month. It’s led to one foodbank seeing a 67% increase in their referrals, and another has been working flat out to help people with their claims. We are concerned this will only get worse as winter approaches and more pressure will be put on stretched voluntary groups left to step in and help in the absence of other practical support.

Work to amend Universal Credit’s design and tackle poor administration in the system is needed before it can be rolled out effectively: reducing the 6-week wait for a first payment and providing more support through programmes like Universal Support would make a real difference to people navigating the new system.

In the absence of this, we support Citizens Advice’s call for a pause to the roll-out of Universal Credit, particularly until appropriate emergency financial support is available and accessible to all people left with no income or food in the cupboard.”

 

You can read more about the impact foodbanks are reporting following Universal Credit roll-out in their area in our report, Early Warnings, or in our submission to the Work and Pensions Select Committee in September 2017.

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David McAuley stepping down as Trussell Trust Chief Executive & moving onto new challenges

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National anti-poverty charity The Trussell Trust, which co-ordinates the largest network of foodbanks in the UK, has announced today that David McAuley will be stepping down as Chief Executive. He will be moving onto the charity OPENhouse, a charity which helps young people and vulnerable people discover their potential.

David McAuley joined The Trussell Trust in August 2008, and took up the role of Chief Executive in January 2014. He has overseen the creation of the More Than Food program, which has included schemes to offer fuel vouchers to people referred to foodbanks, cooking and budgeting courses, and holiday clubs.

The Trussell Trust is actively seeking a new Chief Executive, but in the meantime the charity will be functioning as normal.

 

David McAuley said today:

“When I joined The Trussell Trust we had 13 foodbanks open, one house of opportunity in Bulgaria, a very small charity shop and social enterprise, and a dream to help as many people as we could. Together with the dedication of over 40,000 volunteers in communities across the UK, over the past nine years we have turned that dream into a reality.

 

“It has been an incredible journey and a privilege to be CEO of The Trussell Trust for three years, but I believe the time is right to move on to a new challenge.  Leading a charity which harnesses the power and generosity of volunteers has been inspiring, as has working with a team of committed and hard-working people. I am energised and looking forward to taking my skills to a new cause.”

 

Liz Pollard, Chairman of Trustees, said today:

“The last few years have seen the need for foodbanks continue to grow, with our Foodbank Network providing record numbers of emergency food supplies in the last financial year. David’s leadership of The Trussell Trust has been defined by his wish to find innovative solutions to the grave problem of hunger in the UK. It’s David’s vision and enthusiasm that has pioneered the charity’s new More Than Food programme, to build resilience and make sure people don’t need a foodbank parcel in the first place. It’s an incredible achievement and we wish him all the best as he moves onto a new opportunity.”

ENDS

For more information contact Garry Lemon, Head of Media & External Affairs on 020 3137 6699.

Notes

The Trussell Trust:

  • The Trussell Trust is an anti-poverty charity that runs a network of over 420 foodbanks across the UK.
  • Trussell Trust foodbanks provide three days’ nutritionally balanced food and support to people in crisis in the UK, and many foodbanks offer free additional services, like money advice and budget cookery courses as part of the charity’s ‘More Than Food’ approach, to build resilience and help prevent people needing referral to a foodbank again. Foodbank volunteers are also trained to signpost people to other agencies and services able to help resolve the underlying cause of the crisis.
  • Everyone who comes to a Trussell Trust foodbank is referred by a professional such as a social worker, health visitor or schools liaison officer. Over 30,000 frontline professionals refer people to Trussell Trust foodbanks, and 50 percent are statutory agencies.
  • Over 90 percent of food given out by Trussell Trust foodbanks is donated by the public. In 2016-17, 11,175 tonnes of food were given to people in crisis.
  • The Trussell Trust is a charity motivated by Christian principles. For more about The Trussell Trust visit trusselltrust.org

 

 

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Half of children helped by foodbanks over summer holiday months are primary school students

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67,506 three day emergency food supplies were provided for children by The Trussell Trust’s foodbank network in July and August 2016 compared to 63,094 in May and June 2016. Between July and August 2016, of all 67, 506 three day emergency food supplies from The Trussell Trust foodbank network that went to children:

 

  • 27% went to 0-4 year olds
  • 47% went to 5-11 year olds
  • 21% went to 12-16 year olds
  • 5% went to children for whom their age was not known

 

This summer Trussell Trust foodbanks across the UK will be working to offer extra help to families struggling this summer. At least 60 foodbanks in The Trussell Trust’s network will be providing additional services to families struggling during the holiday, and 24 of these will run a Trussell Trust Holiday Club. The Holiday Clubs project, supported by the Innocent Foundation, has been designed for both children and parents to provide families with fun learning activities and a hot nutritious meal. Trained volunteers talk with parents to understand why they are struggling this summer and signpost families onto relevant local services or organisations to provide further support. Each club with capacity to do so will offer parents a ‘benefits health check’ using the Turn2us Benefits Calculator.**

 

The new age insights from The Trussell Trust’s data collection system also reveal the percentage of primary school children helped by foodbanks is consistently high all-year round (46% of all children referred between April 2016 and March 2017 were between 5-11), highlighting the need for support throughout the year, not only in the holidays. Foodbanks will continue to work all-year round to establish strong working relationships with local agencies to ensure families in need can be referred to the foodbank for emergency food and support.

 

Samantha Stapley, Operations Manager for England at The Trussell Trust, said:

 

“Over a third of all the food distributed by foodbanks in our network consistently goes to children, but these new figures show 5 to 11 year-olds are more likely than other children to receive a foodbank’s help. This highlights just how close to crisis many families are living. We can all make a difference – checking which food your local foodbank is running low on and donating to make sure emergency food is available when people are referred to help is a simple and effective way to get involved. You could be helping a family that lives on your street.

 

“As a nation we also must address the reasons why families with children are referred to foodbanks in the first place. We welcome the Government’s decision to maintain free school lunches for children during term time – the next step must be to help families during the holidays. Foodbanks are doing more than ever before but voluntary organisations alone cannot stop primary school children facing hunger. We are keen to share our insights with the new Government alongside other charities to inform a long-term coordinated solution to stop families falling into crisis.”

 

The Rt. Rev the Lord Bishop of Truro Tim Thornton, said:

 

 “It is shocking to read the statistics and the breakdown provided by The Trussell Trust.  That so many primary age children are going without food in our country is of great concern.  It is good that so many voluntary organisations, the vast majority of which are based on churches are working to provide help for families during the summer holidays.  It is very good that the community wants to help and work with those less fortunate and that is a key part of the gospel values.  It is however also important that we keep trying to understand the deeper reasons why this situation is as it is.”

The new figures come as The Trussell Trust launches its national Summer Appeal and encourages people to donate to their local foodbank as the school holidays start. Everyone can help make a difference – a donation to The Trussell Trust’s Summer Appeal will help develop projects like Holiday Clubs, which help foodbanks provide additional support to people and prevent them needing a foodbank in the future, and a food donation to a local foodbank will go to someone referred for emergency help. For more information, please visit  www.trusselltrust.org/summer-appeal.

 

Ends

 

Notes to Editor

 

Age data breakdown:

 

67,506 three day emergency food supplies were provided for children by The Trussell Trust’s foodbank network in July and August 2016 compared to 63,094 in May and June 2016.

 

Between July and August 2016, of all 67, 506 three day emergency food supplies from The Trussell Trust foodbank network that went to children,

  • 27% went to 0-4 year olds
  • 47% went to 5-11 year olds
  • 21% went to 12-16 year olds
  • 5% went to children for whom their age was not know

 

Between April 2016 and March 2017, of all 436,938 three day emergency food supplies from The Trussell Trust foodbank network that went to children,

  • 27% went to 0-4 year olds
  • 46% went to 5-11 year olds
  • 21% went to 12-16 year olds
  • 6% went to children for whom their age was not known

 

The Trussell Trust:

  • The Trussell Trust is an anti-poverty charity that runs a network of over 420 foodbanks across the UK.
  • Trussell Trust foodbanks provide three days’ nutritionally balanced food and support to people in crisis in the UK, and many foodbanks offer free additional services, like money advice and budget cookery courses as part of the charity’s ‘More Than Food’ approach, to build resilience and help prevent people needing referral to a foodbank again. Foodbank volunteers are also trained to signpost people to other agencies and services able to help resolve the underlying cause of the crisis.
  • Everyone who comes to a Trussell Trust foodbank is referred by a professional such as a social worker, health visitor or schools liaison officer. Over 30,000 frontline professionals refer people to Trussell Trust foodbanks, and 50 percent are statutory agencies.
  • Over 90 percent of food given out by Trussell Trust foodbanks is donated by the public. In 2016-17, 11,175 tonnes of food were given to people in crisis.
  • The Trussell Trust is a charity motivated by Christian principles. For more about The Trussell Trust visit trusselltrust.org

*Trussell Trust statistics:

  • The Trussell Trust statistics are a measure of volume – they show the number of people to whom The Trussell Trust foodbanks have given three days’ emergency food. These are not necessarily unique users. For example, if a family of three was referred to a foodbank twice in one year, this would count as six people on the system, because someone received three days’ emergency food six times. However, if a family of three were only referred to a foodbank once, this would count as three.
  • On average, people need two foodbank vouchers in a year. Our figures have always been reported in this way. You can read more on our figures here: https://www.trusselltrust.org/news-and-blog/latest-stats/end-year-stats/

**Turn2us: Turn2us is a national charity that helps people in financial hardship to gain access to welfare benefits, charitable grants and support services. The Turn2us benefit calculator works out whether someone is entitled to any means tested benefits, and if so which ones. For more about Turn2us visit https://www.turn2us.org.uk

 

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Local Welfare Provision: A Local Jigsaw?

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The Trussell Trust, which runs a network of over 420 foodbanks in the UK, contacted foodbanks and Local Authorities in England in order to map provision of Local Welfare Assistance Schemes (LWAS) and share best practice, alongside identifying areas for improving service provision and interventions to reduce people experiencing financial crisis. Information from over 77 (24%) of foodbanks in The Trussell Trust network and 74 (21%) local authorities in England is included in the report. (more…)

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Cutting edge research provides unparalleled detail on UK Poverty

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People referred to foodbanks face extreme financial insecurity and are struggling with rising food and housing costs, research by the University of Oxford has revealed. The research also finds that half of households referred to foodbanks include a disabled person, while mental health problems affect people in 1 in 3 households.

Commissioned by The Trussell Trust, which runs a network of over 420 foodbanks in the UK, this is the single biggest nationwide study on foodbank use to date. Involving more than 400 households referred to foodbanks, the data collected on demographics, income levels, living conditions, health, and food insecurity provides unparalleled new detail about both the circumstances of people referred to foodbanks and the key drivers of foodbank use.

Key findings on the circumstances of people referred to foodbanks

  • Financial and food insecurity: Almost half of households reported their incomes were unsteady from week-to-week and month-to-month. 78% are severely food insecure (meaning they had skipped meals and gone without eating – sometimes for days at a time – in the past 12 months), while over half could not afford heating or toiletries
  • Price rises: 3 in 5 households had recently experienced rising or unexpected expenses, with 25% of these saying higher food expenses were to blame, confirming the impact of food inflation on squeezed budgets
  • Housing: 28% of those who had experienced rising expenses said this was due to housing costs, such as rent or energy, going up. Tenants in private housing were more likely to find it difficult to keep up with rents than socially rented properties
  • Disability and mental health: Over 50% of households included a disabled person, consistent with the definition used in national surveys. 75% experienced ill health in their household. Mental health conditions affected people in 1/3 of households
  • Debt: 1 in 3 households were finding it difficult to make minimum monthly repayments on outstanding loans, and nearly 1 in 5 in debt owed money to payday lenders

The report found people were experiencing multiple forms of destitution. 50% had gone without heating for more than four days in the past 12 months, 50% couldn’t afford toiletries, and 1 in 5 had slept rough in the last 12 months. Over 78% of households were severely, and often chronically, food insecure.

Key findings on drivers of foodbank use

Almost all households had experienced a drop in income in the past three months, unsteady incomes, or an unexpected expense or rise in expenses in the past three months.

  • Benefit delays: Nearly 2 in 5 people were awaiting a benefit payment, with most of these waiting up to 6 weeks, though a fifth were waiting 7 weeks or more. A third of delays were for Employment Support Allowance payments, with people assessed as capable of taking steps to move into work in the future particularly at risk of needing a foodbank
  • Income shocks: 2 in 3 people had been hit by a recent ‘income shock’, with most experiencing sharp rises in housing costs or food expenses
  • Low income: The average income of households in the month before being referred to a foodbank was reported at around £320, with 20% of households still needing to pay housing costs. This falls well below low income thresholds, before and after housing costs, and is a fraction of the national average. 16% had no income at all in the last month

David McAuley, Chief Executive of The Trussell Trust, said today:

“Last year, Trussell Trust foodbank volunteers provided 1.2 million emergency food supplies to people in crisis. This pioneering research confirms to us what those volunteers have been telling us: Every day they are meeting people trying to cope with low, insecure incomes and rising prices that mean even the smallest unexpected expense can leave them destitute and hungry – be that an unexpected bill, bereavement or the loss of income caused by benefit delay. Particularly concerning are the very high numbers of disabled people or people with mental health problems needing foodbanks.

“These findings reaffirm how vital the work of foodbanks and generosity of donors is, but are also a clear challenge to the new Government to do more to stop people ending up in crisis in the first place. In particular, we call for a renewed commitment to halving the disability employment gap through a Work, Disability, and Health Bill, and for this commitment to include a review into the financial support provided for people who are in the ‘work-related activity group’, on Employment Support Allowance. Making work more secure and tackling the high cost of living would also have a significant impact on the lives of people in extreme poverty. I look forward to working with the new Government to start tackling these issues together.”

Dr Rachel Loopstra, the lead author of the report, Lecturer in Nutrition at King’s College London, and Associate Member of the Department of Sociology, University of Oxford, said today:

“The stories emerging from food banks across the country have surprised and shocked many people but until now, we have not been able to put them in a numerical context. Our survey data show how people using food banks are unable to ensure they always have enough food to eat because their incomes are too low and too insecure. We observed how commonly income or expenditure shocks, whether arising from a delay in receiving a benefit payment, from a benefit sanction, or from rising energy costs, tipped households into food bank use. But these shocks, and resulting food bank usage, occur among people who live with extremely low incomes and chronic food insecurity, where meeting basic needs is an ongoing struggle. The severity and chronicity of food insecurity and other forms of destitution we observed amongst people using food banks are serious public health concerns.”

The report emphasises a need for intervention to help reduce extreme poverty and foodbank use:

  1. An inquiry into adequacy of benefits and support for disabled people or people with long-term health conditions that make getting into work, or staying in work, difficult or impossible, as well as continued commitment to reviewing the appropriateness of Work Capability Assessments, would be invaluable.
  2. Delays in benefit payments must be addressed with urgency, with more support provided for people affected, with a view to indexing benefits to the cost of living.
  3. Insecure employment must be addressed in order to make sure work pays and reduce the financial vulnerability of people in insecure or low-paid work.
  4. An evaluation of the impact of conditionality, particularly as Universal Credit extends sanctioning to people in work.

The full report is available here.

ENDS

Contact The Trussell Trust Press Office at 020 3137 3699 or press@trusselltrust.org

Abby Jitendra, abby.jitendra@trusselltrust.org or Emma Thorogood, emma.thorogood@trusselltrust.org

 Notes

This report was a collaborative project between researchers at the University of Oxford, King’s College London, and The Trussell Trust Foodbank Network. It was jointly funded by the ESRC Impact Acceleration Account at the University of Oxford and the Trussell Trust. The research was designed and facilitated by Rachel Loopstra and Doireann Lalor, with support from Trussell Trust staff. A random sample of foodbanks from England, Scotland and Wales was selected to be invited to participate in the study. This report is based on data from the first 18 participating foodbanks, which were trained to implement and facilitate data collection in their own distribution sites. Over 4-week data collection periods, food banks recruited a significant total sample of 413 households. This reflected a response rate of 71% of eligible households asked to participate.

The Trussell Trust:

  • The Trussell Trust is an anti-poverty charity that runs a network of over 420 foodbanks across the UK.
  • Trussell Trust foodbanks provide three days’ nutritionally balanced food and support to people in crisis in the UK, and many foodbanks offer free additional services, like money advice and budget cookery courses as part of the charity’s ‘More Than Food’ approach, to build resilience and help prevent people needing referral to a foodbank again. Foodbank volunteers are also trained to signpost people to other agencies and services able to help resolve the underlying cause of the crisis.
  • Everyone who comes to a Trussell Trust foodbank is referred by a professional such as a social worker, health visitor or schools liaison officer. Over 30,000 frontline professionals refer people to Trussell Trust foodbanks, and 50 percent are statutory agencies.
  • Over 90 percent of food given out by Trussell Trust foodbanks is donated by the public. In 2016-17, 11,175 tonnes of food were given to people in crisis.

The Trussell Trust is a charity motivated by Christian principles. For more on The Trussell Trust visit www.trusselltrust.org

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My experience of a university placement at Bournemouth Foodbank

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Initially, I was apprehensive; this was the first time I could put into practice what I have been taught during the last 2 years at university. However, there was no need to be nervous as the food bank team at Bournemouth were incredibly welcoming and made me feel at home.

Bournemouth Foodbank and The Trussell Trust are carrying out fantastic work in providing nutrition to those in crisis. I have been amazed at how generous the public are in donating their time to volunteer at the foodbank, but also the volume of those donating food. (more…)

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