Blog

The next stage of Universal Credit: what should the new Secretary of State do?

Share this:

A blog post by
Sumi Rabindrakumar
Head of Policy & Research 


The new Secretary of State has said she wants to make sure that Universal Credit “becomes a force wholly for good”. After successive cuts, flawed design and problematic delivery, this is a bold ambition. Her first test will be the much-anticipated next stage of Universal Credit roll-out – ‘managed migration’.

The government is poised to debate regulations which determine the process for the next stage of Universal Credit, where people claiming benefits under the old systems will need to move to the new benefits system. The task at hand cannot be underestimated. Three million people will have their benefits stopped and will need to reapply to continue to receive support.

Read more

What does this week’s announcement on Universal Credit mean?

Share this:
A blog post by
Garry Lemon
Director of Policy, External Affairs & Research

On Monday afternoon the Government published an update to its plans for the next stage of Universal Credit, ‘managed migration’.

Until now, only people making a new application have gone onto the new benefits system. This next stage will see people already receiving a benefits or tax credits payment under the old system move onto Universal Credit.

At The Trussell Trust, we’ve been watching the development of these plans closely. As a nation we created systems like our national health service, fire service and benefits system because we’re a country that believes in protecting each other – but we’ve seen more and more people needing foodbanks in areas where Universal Credit has been rolled out.

Read more

Help us make Universal Credit work for everyone

Share this:
A blog post by
Garry Lemon
Director of Policy, External Affairs & Research

Universal Credit is the biggest change to the welfare system in a generation and here at The Trussell Trust, we’ve been working hard with foodbanks in our network to monitor it. Our research has found that the system is leaving people behind – disabled people, families, and other vulnerable groups – and can push people into debt. Analysing data from foodbanks in our network, we’ve found that foodbanks in full Universal Credit rollout for 12 months or more have seen a 52% increase in need, compared to 13% elsewhere.

This is unacceptable. We need change now. You can help make this change.

The Trussell Trust has been working with End Hunger UK, since its inception in 2016, to tackle the root causes of hunger and lobby for policy and structural changes from government. End Hunger UK is built on a vision of a society where everyone has access to good food, and no one must go to bed hungry.

Read more

Why the Government’s announcement on disability benefits means fewer people will need foodbanks

Share this:

Abby Jitendra, Policy and Research Manager

Every week foodbanks in our network meet people with health conditions or disabilities who, without emergency help from the local community, would have faced going hungry. Just as we all expect to be able to access free healthcare anywhere in the UK, we would expect that if you are struggling to get by because of a health condition, sufficient financial support would be available. But poor administration and continued reductions in disabled people’s benefit payments mean the welfare safety net, which should be freeing people from the restraints of poverty, is locking people in.

Read more

What’s in a Trussell Trust foodbank parcel and why?

Share this:

Samantha Stapley, Director of Operations:

Foodbanks in our network use standard packing lists for each emergency food parcel that goes to someone in crisis. This is to ensure a balanced supply of food, whatever the household size, is provided to everyone referred – you can see an example of a list for a single person below.

Read more

‘You can’t live on thin air’: the wait for Universal Support

Share this:

Abby Jitendra, Senior Policy Officer at The Trussell Trust

 

‘I am sick, disabled, and visually impaired, hard of hearing. No help has been offered. I had to go ask my local church for help.’

The impact of Universal Credit on society in the UK is only just beginning to be felt. By 2022, all existing eligible claimants – 12 million people – still on the legacy benefits system will have been migrated to the new system. Universal Credit is, by design, a departure from the legacy benefits system, and the transition has already had wide-ranging effects on claimants, statutory bodies, and voluntary organisations.

Read more

Yes, Universal Credit should make work pay – but the benefits system must protect us all from hunger

Share this:

Garry Lemon, Head of External Affairs at The Trussell Trust:

Since its inception we have supported – and still support – the key principles of Universal Credit. We agree that a simplified benefits system that is easier to navigate would help millions of people across the UK. We agree that work should always pay for those supported by this new benefit.

But there is a third principle that must underpin our entire welfare state: it must provide enough money for those who need it to afford the basics – at the very least, food and shelter. As a nation, we expect no one should be left hungry or destitute. Illness, disability, family breakdown or the loss of a job can happen to any of us. We owe it to ourselves to ensure sufficient financial support is there when we need it most.

Read more

We smile, offer a cuppa and have a wee chat: what’s it actually like inside a foodbank?

Share this:

If you’ve caught any news over the past few years, you’ve probably heard a fair bit about the rise in foodbank use.

But it’s hard to imagine what a foodbank is actually like if you’ve never been inside one.

I run Hamilton District Foodbank. We work across Hamilton and Blantyre in South Lanarkshire, and have been giving emergency food to people referred to us since 2013 – in 2016-17 we provided 4,015 food supplies to local people. But like so many other foodbanks in The Trussell Trust’s network, we offer a lot more than emergency food.

Read more

As the cold weather bites, how do we ensure everyone has enough money for fuel?

Share this:

“I am constantly writing letters and making phone calls to see what help or advice I can get. I am at breaking point, as each day there is something else to contend with. I feel helpless, mentally exhausted and so low. I really don’t know what I am going to do. I cannot get by month to month. It’s hard enough doing it week to week on a low income. I can’t afford to use my heating, even though it is so cold and my son suffers with his chest and lungs. No doubt he will end up in hospital during this cold period.”

This Fuel Poverty Awareness Day, we want to want to raise awareness not only of fuel poverty, but also the responses, both amongst local communities and through policy, that can stem the tide.

Read more

Putting food on the table: the human right to eat in the fifth richest country in the world

Share this:

As a society, we believe in justice and compassion. That, as we grow up, we should have the same chance to get on and succeed in life – whether we’re from the Cheshire countryside, or the potteries of Stoke-on-Trent.

For most of us, this starts with having enough to eat, proper clothing, and a safe place to call home. But what happens when we can’t put enough food on the table? Who can – and should – step in to help?

Read more
Page 3 of 912345...Last »